It’s Our Lucky Daye

R&B mastermind, Lucky Daye, is one of the most exciting voices in R&B right now with his forlorn tales of tragedy that find their way into the light.

The New Orleans rising star Lucky Daye had something of an excellent year in 2019. With Grammy nominations, a global tour, the release his debut album ‘Painted’ and millions of streams worldwide, it seems like Lucky was only setting the bar of what’s to come in 2020.

 

Lucky Daye first gained buzz around the release of his single “Roll Some Mo”, which has since gone on to stream over 25 million times worldwide across platforms. After releasing EPs I and II, his debut album Painted established Lucky as a powerful voice in R&B, and when I meet up with him in London on one of those hopeful winter mornings it’s like meeting up with an old friend. Lucky’s emits the most chill energy which is always a bonus when you’re on set, and immediately makes everyone feel relaxed and at ease around him. It’s clear that it’s just Lucky Daye in the room – no past, no future, no ego – just the present-day Lucky.

 

With the year that Lucky had, you could probably get the wrong notion that there would be a full entourage of people surrounding him, but thankfully it’s just him and his winning smile. The music that Lucky Daye crafts is smoky, cinematic, dark, sultry and everything in-between as he is one of the pioneer’s of the contemporary R&B revival. It’s clear when some artists have a plan for things to go this way, but for Lucky, it’s all just blessing.

 

Lucky Daye, born David Brown, was a member of a now-defunct Christian church until he was eight-years-old that imposed strict rules on what he could or couldn’t do. Popular music was considered a sin, so naturally Lucky still found his voice through church hymns. Fast-forward to 2020, and we are more than glad that Lucky stuck to his calling, and if you want to know more, it’s all in the music as Lucky’s tracks on Painted read like chapters of his life with the overriding theme of hope tying it all together.

 

Listening to Lucky’s voice is the perfect amalgamation of old school and new age. He has the kind of voice that stays with you as it makes you feel exactly what he wants you to. It’s a rarity when that kind of voice comes along, then combined with his alluring and prolific lyricism, it’s hard not to imagine you’re in an old Hollywood movie. In reality, it’s been Lucky’s life so far, with all of its pain and its glory, in the age-old battle of light versus dark, with light reigning supreme in the end.

 

As Lucky Daye is only getting started, with 2019 as the bar of what’s to come, it seems like we are all in luck for more hauntingly beautiful music from this R&B renaissance master. Get to know the man behind the music below, it’s your Lucky Daye!

If you could summarise it, what would be the story of how you became a
musician?

I think I have to write a movie about that first. I’m not done not quite done yet. A short version would be, “He chose me.”

How would you describe your sound?

‘Future Classic’.

What are some of your first memories of music?

My first memory is sitting in the back of the church, clapping my hands and trying to compete with other kids to see who’s claps were best. It was like we were competing for who’s double clap sounded the loudest.

What’s the best part of being on the road? The worst part?

The best part would be hearing the crowds scream and sing the words to my music. The worst part is seeing people pass out sometimes, but it’s also nice too.

What is something that not many people would know about you?

What they don’t know about me, is that my imagination of love supersedes the reality of love.

What energy do you want to give off when you perform live?

I want to give off the peak of every emotion because that’s the place where you go to have fun and let it all go.

What are you most looking forward to in 2020?

Album number two and hearing my voice on the same songs as other artists.

What does being in love feel like for you?

Drowning in firewater.

What is the best piece of advice you have been given?

‘Don’t forget everything you’ve been through. Bring your imaginary backpack everywhere you go, and put everything in there and pull it out whenever you need to.’ – Tony Vick

Do you have a favourite lyric you’ve written right now?

‘Can you hear you when you reign so loud, flood flood away.’

If you could say one thing to baby Lucky, what would it be?

I would tell baby Lucky to “think fast.”

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